Frisky clubbers risk their lives with fake Viagra

fake viagraIf you were suffering with heart problems, you wouldn’t take a cheap, dangerous knock-off counterfeit medication as opposed to the genuine article, so why do this when it comes to other aspects of your health?

We ask this as there is a worrying trend of young males abusing alcohol on a night out and suffering from the dreaded ‘brewers droop’, then instead of taking legitimately prescribed Pfizer Viagra, are chugging down fake Viagra pills – most likely bought for a couple of quid from their mate down the pub.

According to an article in the Daily Star Online, party goers are taking fake Viagra in a combination with dangerous party drugs such as MDMA and cocaine, which could be a potentially fatal cocktail of drugs.

Another problem is that there are now online forums simply full of spam URL links from individuals as well as fake online overseas pharmacies flogging counterfeit male impotence drugs, people who will happily send their ineffective or dangerous drugs to the UK – without the need for a prescription. This is one immediate and obvious sign that not is all as it seems.

After all, are you able to walk into a high street pharmacy and simply purchase prescription-only medicines without being in the possession of a doctor’s prescription? The answer is of course, no, you cannot.

One 30-year-old night clubber spoke to the Daily Star Online 30, reporting how he had witnessed with his own eyes some of his mates buying ‘Viagra’ in huge quantities off the internet and taking them for a night out on the pull.

He said: “Some people take it when they’re high on other stuff, so they can perform.

“I got handed one once on a night out after taking some cocaine and immediately got a splitting headache. But I was hard for four hours. I was shooting dust by the end.”

Maybe whatever this gentleman took did contain Sildenafil (the active ingredient inside genuine Viagra), however, some counterfeit Viagra may contain either little to no Sildenafil, or simply doses of the drug that are far too high. Real Viagra that is manufactured by Pfizer comes in doses of either 25mg, 50mg, or 100mg.

Anything exceeding this could prove dangerous, especially for those already with other existing health issues, such as heart conditions.

Therefore, for those looking to improve their erections and sex life without going to speak to your GP or completing an online consultation with a registered pharmacy, there is clearly a huge risk involved with obtaining medicines from other means.

Some of the serious side effects associated with erectile dysfunction drugs – especially the fake ones – include a loss of vision due to low blood pressure, diarrhoea and even fatal cardiac arrest.

The UK’s medicines and health regulatory body (MHRA) spoke to the Daily Star Online, warning that fake Viagra poses a “serious health risk”.

In fact a lot of men are mistakenly under the impression they are getting the branded Viagra, but instead will receive a cheaper, unlicensed medicine such as Kamagra, sometimes coming in a gel form.

According to many news outlets, Kamagra was one of a possible number of drugs that notoriously left former basketball star Lamar Odom in a coma after he took “up to ten tablets” of the supplement.

MHRA have seized £30 million worth of fake Viagra in the UK in the last 7 years in raids and this includes a record £11 million seized in targeted police raids in 2016 alone.

They told Daily Star Online: “Selling unlicensed medicines is both illegal and poses a serious risk to public health.

“Anyone involved in illegal activity with medicines or medical devices is breaking the law; we investigate all cases and take appropriate action up to and including a criminal prosecution.

“Criminals involved in the illegal supply of medicines aren’t interested in your health – they are only interested in your money.

“Unlicensed medicines can be dangerous as they can contain impurities, wrong ingredients, and there is no way of knowing if they are manufactured to acceptable standards of quality and safety.”

With thousands of illegal fake online pharmacy websites still plaguing the internet, offering ‘discounted’ medicines with ridiculous (and illegal) deals on prescription drugs – i.e. ‘buy one get one free’ – it can be difficult to know who to trust or where to buy from.

On a daily basis Medical Specialists® speak to concerned patients. With this in mind, here are some warning signs and red flags when trying to determine if an online pharmacy is legitimate and who they say they are:

. No requirement of a doctors’ consultation for prescription medication.

. Long delivery times, sometimes up to several weeks. This is due to the drug being imported from a foreign country before it gets to you.

. The price of the medication is a lot cheaper than what would be expected, sometimes by as much as 70%.

. The website does not list any contact details, e.g. a telephone and fax number, email address, company address or details of its pharmacists, doctors, etc.

. The company registration and VAT number should both be clearly stated on the website. Both of these are a legal requirement.

. A registered Pharmacy such as Medical Specialists® Pharmacy will display a clearly visible and clickable GPhC green cross logo on their website, together with its pharmacy number. This number can be checked on the GPhC pharmacy register to see if the pharmacy exists.

. As an extra level of security, reassurance and peace of mind for the consumer, from 2015, legimate pharmacies had to display the EU common logo on every page of the website where selling to a patient occurs. This helps members of the public to identify websites that can legally sell medicines. Like the GPhC logo, the EU common logo is clickable, but the hyperlink will direct people to the that pharmacy’s listing on the MHRA’s list of registered online pharmacies and should state that the pharmacy has been approved by the MHRA.

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