Hay fever sufferers are warned that pollen levels will continue to rise well into August

It seems the millions of hay fever sufferers in the UK cannot catch a break. Last month warnings were given that weather conditions could trigger attacks, and now further subsequent fluctuating weather is set to drag on the pollen season for another month according to weather experts.  At Medical Specialists Pharmacy we have already witnessed a recent surge in sales of products such as Nasonex, Prevalin and Loratadine, as sufferers rush for help in combating the irritating and troublesome symptoms that include red and itchy eyes, sneezing and a runny nose.

Since the beginning of spring we have seen rather odd fluctuations in weather. Back in March the country had a few weeks of blazing sunshine which resulted in the triggering of symptoms for the 16 million sufferers in the UK. Therefore, one could assume that the recent heavy rain fall would mean peace and quiet for those who have hay fever. Unfortunately though, this is not the case it seems. High levels of rainfall have resulted in flowers and grasses flourishing, resulting in extra pollen being generated. In fact June has been so rain-filled that provisional data indicates this has been the wettest June since records began in 1910, and the coldest in 21 years.

During the rare few days when the temperature has been quite high, pollen has proceeded to rise in the air and then circulated about after the wind picks up. NHS Direct say they have received 20% more enquiries from hay fever sufferers since the beginning of June and unfortunately weather experts have warned sufferers that although grass pollen (the most common allergy) usually peaks in July, this year it could last well into August.  In addition, The Health Protection Agency has noted that more and more people are complaining about eye problems in relation to allergies, and that this seems to be more prevalent in children. One particularly product that has been shown to help relieve these symptoms is Alomide Allergy Eye Drops, which due to high levels of interest, Medical Specialists Pharmacy have recently added to its huge range of products.

Beverley Adams-Groom is the chief palynologist at the National Pollen Research Unit at the University of Worcester and she has spoken out on the bizarre weather that has swept the country, “We are getting a lot of intermittent rainy days that are sending the pollen counts up and down at the moment. We can expect this very changeable weather to extend the pollen season. We can see a continued risk for a long time yet, probably into the beginning of August.”

The Met Office provides daily updates in regards to pollen forecasts, and health business manager Philip Sachon further explained the problems for hay fever sufferers and gave advice, saying, “All the rain we have had can help to suppress the pollen count in the short term by washing it out of the air but it does mean everything gets growing really well. On the warmer dry days it will mean the pollen counts will get quite high. We are going to continue seeing high and possibly very high pollen counts on any nice sunny days. If we continue to get good growth in weeds as well, there will be a lot of high pollen from them too. The coast is a good place to go for some respite as the wind comes off the sea and tends to carry less pollen. So on days when the pollen count is high, it is a good day to head to the beach.”

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